Abbey Lincoln portrait, revised

A couple of years ago, I drew this portrait of Abbey Lincoln in one of my sketchbooks. I was experimenting with painting a shape and then inking line details on top. The paper was a bit too thin for the gouache painting so some wrinkling occurred and came through in the scan along with the gutter fold of the sketchbook.

I opened the scan in Photoshop and converted the blue painted shape into a single color. This also captured a bit of the gutter fold shadow creating a crease across the face area.

I then converted all of the ink line details to solid black. This also captured some of the gutter fold shadow along with some additional shadow areas from the wrinkling of the paper.

I cleaned up the black from the wrinkle shadows as well as the sketchbook edges, but decided to leave the gutter shadow marks. I liked the accidental aspect of it and how it referenced the sketchbook, also how the line related to the diagonal black lines in the background. I didn't realize though that some might see this mark as a cut across the face, not my intention of course. And I realized that the reference to the sketchbook was probably only apparent to me. So I decided to remove the gutter shadow "cut" mark.

I also lightened up the blue a bit. And looking back at this piece, I remembered that I had made an alternative version, one with less distortion.

I liked how this version turned out, although I think it makes the body appear a bit odd in relation to the head. Overall, I prefer the distorted version, even better without the cut.

Walking therapy illustration

I created this illustration for the Minneapolis Star Tribune for a story about a therapist who walks and talks with her patients rather than meet with them in her office.

I created this illustration for the Minneapolis Star Tribune for a story about a therapist who walks and talks with her patients rather than meet with them in her office.

The art director saw these two illustrations in my portfolio and asked me to create a new illustration incorporating hand lettering with walking figures.

The art director saw these two illustrations in my portfolio and asked me to create a new illustration incorporating hand lettering with walking figures.

To reference, Minneapolis, I chose the Stone Arch Bridge, a metaphor for the therapy.

To reference, Minneapolis, I chose the Stone Arch Bridge, a metaphor for the therapy.

I tightened up the sketch but the art director wanted me to include land at the top of the illustration, a reference to the city, or a park, something on the other side of the bridge, a destination.

I tightened up the sketch but the art director wanted me to include land at the top of the illustration, a reference to the city, or a park, something on the other side of the bridge, a destination.

I roughed up a quick revised sketch with a cityscape. These rougher figures actually influenced the direction of how I would end up depicting the figures, less line and more shape.

I roughed up a quick revised sketch with a cityscape. These rougher figures actually influenced the direction of how I would end up depicting the figures, less line and more shape.

Above is the hand lettering I created for the illustration along with some buildings and shrubs. I decided to go with a park destination rather than a city skyline destination for the top part of the illustration.  Below is the Photoshop art in sequential states of completion. I begin with a background of textures and then repeat and edit these textures to create the other parts of the illustration.

Above is the hand lettering I created for the illustration along with some buildings and shrubs. I decided to go with a park destination rather than a city skyline destination for the top part of the illustration.

Below is the Photoshop art in sequential states of completion. I begin with a background of textures and then repeat and edit these textures to create the other parts of the illustration.

I really liked this stage, felt finished to me, calm yet active.

I really liked this stage, felt finished to me, calm yet active.

Above is the final with the strip of land at the top. This strip added more color and gave the piece an optimistic feeling, like spring.

Above is the final with the strip of land at the top. This strip added more color and gave the piece an optimistic feeling, like spring.

Sprick

sprick-hand-001b  

Sprick is a term from my school days, junior high. Using your thumb, you held back your finger, tensing it up, and then, when you loosened your thumb, your finger snapped out at its target, the earlobe of the person sitting in front of you for example, causing sharp pain. I was usually on the receiving end of this.

This is also how you flick a paper football. But we called it sprick rather than flick, probably because it sounded less friendly.

New England TB Symposium illustration

I made this illustration for the New England TB Symposium. It was used for their program and posters as well as mugs and bags. 2013-cabinet

Initially, I drew a pattern of abstract shapes, but the client wanted me to show the drugs used to treat TB. The final sketch fused the cabinet with the head and shoulders profile.

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final-sketch

I used my trimmed Pentel brush pen for the line work. It was getting low on ink which allows me to create a more textural line.

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Below is the illo in a few stages of development.

cabinet-1-copy

cabinet-1-copy2

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